Engineers Develop Stamp-Sized Sticker That Can Provide Ultrasound Imaging for 48 Hours

Researchers made volunteers perform activities, during which, the sticker maintained a strong adhesion and recorded the organs of the subjects.

Engineers Develop Stamp-Sized Sticker That Can Provide Ultrasound Imaging for 48 Hours

Photo Credit: MIT/Felice Frankel

The team is now working toward enabling the device to function wirelessly

Highlights
  • Heavy ultrasound devices are available in hospitals, medical facilities
  • Sticker needs to be connected to instrument to translate recorded data
  • MIT team is developing artificial intelligence-based software algorithms

In what could revolutionise the way ultrasound imaging is performed, engineers have developed a stamp-sized sticker that sticks to the skin and provides continuous ultrasound imaging. Currently, this is done using sophisticated and heavy equipment that requires specialised technicians. These ultrasound machines provide live images of the heart, lungs, and other organs. However, they are mostly only available in hospitals and medical facilities, making them inaccessible for many.

This is what engineers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) have aimed to solve with their new creation. They obviated the need to use bulky machines and developed a small sticker that sticks to the skin and provides ultrasound imaging continuously for 48 hours.

Demonstrating the efficiency of the stickers, researchers applied them to volunteers and produced live, high-resolution images of blood vessels and organs such as lungs, stomach, and heart through the device. The volunteers were made to perform activities like standing, sitting, biking, and jogging, during which, the sticker maintained a strong adhesion and recorded the organs of the subjects.

In the current design of the device, described in the research paper, the sticker needs to be connected to an instrument that translates the recorded data or sound wave into images. However, if the device is made wireless, then, according to researchers, it could be used for a range of purposes.

“We envision a few patches adhered to different locations on the body, and the patches would communicate with your cellphone, where AI algorithms would analyse the images on demand. We believe we've opened a new era of wearable imaging: With a few patches on your body, you could see your internal organs,” said Xuanhe Zhao, professor of mechanical engineering and civil and environmental engineering at MIT. Zhao is also the senior author of the study.

The team is now working toward enabling the device to function wirelessly while they are also developing artificial intelligence-based software algorithms that will allow for better interpretation and diagnosis of the sticker's images.


Should you buy a 4G or 5G budget phone? We discuss this on Orbital, the Gadgets 360 podcast. Orbital is available on Spotify, Gaana, JioSaavn, Google Podcasts, Apple Podcasts, Amazon Music and wherever you get your podcasts.
Comments

For the latest tech news and reviews, follow Gadgets 360 on Twitter, Facebook, and Google News. For the latest videos on gadgets and tech, subscribe to our YouTube channel.

Vivo V25 Alleged Geekbench Listing Suggests MediaTek Dimensity 900 SoC, 8GB RAM
Vivo Y02s Live Images Leaked; Offers Glimpse at Colour Options, Design: Report
Share on Facebook Tweet Snapchat Share Reddit Comment
 
 

Advertisement

Advertisement

© Copyright Red Pixels Ventures Limited 2022. All rights reserved.